New city officials addressing $338,000 spending deficit

A self-imposed audit by Bull Shoals Mayor David Nixon and his administration has revealed $338,000 in overspending in the city's 2016 budget. Nixon, who took office in June, is working with municipal officials to move the city's finances from out of the red and into the black despite numerous challenges.Mayor Nixon says although he likes to look forward rather than behind, addressing budgeting issues from before he took office became a top priority after receiving the third-party audit findings. He says although he was assured the budget was fine, the audit revealed it clearly was not.

He says a new budget process was built, but was delayed until approval at the end of May 2017 and taking effect in July. During that time, the city had to operate under the old process and lost another $100,000. In the third quarter, the city had to pay accrued fines and late charges, however less money was leaked.

Nixon says finances are starting to stabilize.

Listen:

 


right-click to download mp3

According to Nixon, a strong fourth-quarter could mean a turnaround. Historically Bull Shoals has a strong fourth-quarter performance.

Nixon says the progress of a new wastewater treatment plant is more good news in moving the city forward.

Listen:

 


right-click to download mp3

All of the grant paperwork has been filed, and if the federal government performs on its expected timeline, bidding for the project could take place as early as January. Nixon says his administration has been able to cut approximately $300,000 from the anticipated price tag.

Listen:

 


right-click to download mp3

Other items under construction for the City of Bull Shoals include revising personnel manuals and using improved technology to track revenue and expenses.

Nixon says despite 2017 being a high-water level year for the lake, sales tax numbers are up and performing better than in 2016.

The Bull Shoals Chamber of Commerce has been working with the city and has built up a war chest to fund attraction activities.

Short-term plans are to attract tourists from Springfield and surrounding areas. Houston and Dallas are also on the radar.

Aside from the natural beauty of Bull Shoals Lake, the city is built on top of an I.T. infrastructure, made up completely of high-speed fiber optic cable, making it a prime spot to attract Information Technology businesses and remote telecommuters.

WebReadyTM Powered by WireReady® NSI