Police departments distance themselves from Trump's comments encouraging police violence

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- After Donald Trump on Friday made remarks that seemed to encourage rougher treatment of people in police custody, several police departments across the country came out and distanced themselves from the president's comments.

Speaking to law enforcement officers in Brentwood, New York, Trump said, "When you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon, you see them thrown in rough. I said, 'Please don't be too nice.' Like, don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody. I said, 'You can take the hand away, OK?' "


Shortly after the speech, the Suffolk County Police Department, whose jurisdiction is the county in which Trump spoke, came out against the remarks via Twitter.

Following the Suffolk County Police Department's tweets, its counterparts across the country also took to social media to express their dissatisfaction with Trump's remarks and to reiterate their policies for handling people in custody.

GAINESVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT, FLORIDA

The Gainesville Police Department's spokesman, Ben Tobias, also tweeted.

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

"The Boston Police Department's priority has been and continues to be building relationships and trust with the community we serve," read a statement. "As a police department, we are committed to helping people, not harming them."

PHILADELPHIA POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF RICHARD ROSS

SEATTLE POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF KATHLEEN O'TOOLE

"Seattle’s police officers have embraced reform and have worked incredibly hard to build community trust," O'Toole said in a statement. "We do not intend to go backwards. It is truly unfortunate that in today’s toxic environment, politicians at both ends of the spectrum have sought to inflame passions by politicizing what we do. We remain committed to our principles and reject irresponsible statements that threaten to undermine our relationship with the community.

NEW ORLEANS POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF MICHAEL HARRISON

"Any unreasonable or unnecessary application of force against any citizen erodes trust at a time when we need support from our local communities the most," Harrison said in a statement. "This is not a binary choice of either protecting the public or protecting a person's rights. We can and we must protect both, and NOPD will continue to lead the way in adopting policing reforms that do just that."

HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF ART ACEVEDO

NEW YORK POLICE DEPARTMENT

"The NYPD's training and policies relating to the use of force only allow for measures that are reasonable and necessary under any circumstances, including the arrest and transportation of prisoners," read a statement. "To suggest that police officers apply any standard in the use of force other than what is reasonable and necessary is irresponsible, unprofessional and sends the wrong message to law enforcement as well as the public."

SOUTHSIDE PLACE POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF DON MCCALL, TEXAS

LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT CHIEF CHARLIE BECK

LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT FIRST ASSISTANT CHIEF MICHEL R. MOORE

LOS ANGELES COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

"The LASD respects the rights of all our Los Angeles County residents and those outside our jurisdiction," a spokesman said in a statement to ABC News. "We have worked tirelessly to strengthen public trust. We have established some of the most comprehensive and forward-thinking policies and procedures to protect the public and enforce the laws, while at the same time keeping our deputies safe. We will continue to enhance community partnerships and always work to strengthen our commitment to overall public safety."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.